OPENING TIMES, ADMISSION AND WHAT’S ON

Main Building

Zakopane, street Krupówki 10
tel. +48/18-20-152-05, +48/18-20-129-35, fax +48/18-20-63-872

Opening hours:

Monday-Saturday 10: 00-18: 00
Sunday 9:00 to 15:00

Price list:

Normal ticket PLN 7.00
concession ticket PLN 5.50

Guided tours: PLN 40 + entrance tickets,
booking at tel. 18-20-152-05 internal 20

 

Permanent exhibitions: history, ethnography and natural history.
 
Library and reading room in the main building:
open: Tuesday to Friday 8:00 - 16:00
 
Archives open: 8:00 - 15:00

The Museum of the Zakopane Style at "Koliba" villa

(branch of the Tatra Museum)
Zakopane, street Kościeliska 18
tel. 18-20-136-02
 
CLOSED FOR RENOVATION
 

The Kornel Makuszyński Museum

(branch of the Tatra Museum)

Zakopane, street Tetmajer 15

 

Opening hours:

Monday-Friday 9: 00-16: 00

Price list:

normal ticket PLN 6.00

concession ticket PLN 4.50

Guided tours: PLN 20 + admission tickets

tel. 18-20-122-63

 

 
The much-loved writer's flat with works of art and his possessions on display.

The Korkosz Croft

(branch of the Tatra Museum)

Czarna Góra, Zagóra 86

 

CLOSED FOR RENOVATION

The Gallery of 20th Century Art at Oksza villa

Zakopane, street Zamoyskiego 25

 

Opening hours:

Monday-Saturday 10:00-18:00

Sunday, 11:00 to 16:00

Price list:

Normal ticket PLN 7.00

concession ticket PLN 5.50

Guided tours: PLN 20 + admission tickets

tel. 692-029-817

The Władysław Hasior Gallery

(branch of the Tatra Museum)

Zakopane, street Jagiellońska 18 b

 

Opening hours:

Monday-Saturday 10:00-18:00

Sunday 9:00 to 15:00

Price list:

Normal ticket PLN 7.00

concession ticket PLN 5.50

Guided tours: PLN 20 + admission tickets

tel. 18-20-668-71

 

 
Permanent exhibition of Władysław Hasior's works.

Museum of the 1846 Chochołów Uprising

(branch of the Tatra Museum)

Chochołów 75

 

Opening hours:

Wednesday-Sunday 10:00-15:00

Price list:

normal ticket PLN 6.00

concession ticket PLN 4.50

Guided tours: PLN 20 + admission tickets

 

The history of the 1846 Chochołów Uprising and traditional interiors from the second half of the 19th century.

The Sołtys Croft

(branch of the Tatra Museum)
Jurgów 215
 
CLOSED FOR RENOVATION
 

The Museum of the Zakopane Style - Inspirations

(branch of the Tatra Museum)
Zakopane, Droga do Rojów 6

tel. 18-20-122-94

 
CLOSED FOR RENOVATION
 

The Gallery of Art in Koziniec

(branch of the Tatra Museum)
Zakopane, Droga na Koziniec 8
 
CLOSED FOR RENOVATION
 

Łopuszna Manor

(branch of the Tatra Museum)

Łopuszna, ul. Gorczańska 2

 

Opening hours:

Wednesday-Sunday 10:00-18:00

Price list:

normal ticket PLN 6.00

concession ticket PLN 4.50

Guided tours: PLN 30 + admission tickets

tel. 18-26-539-19

 

 
To visit: the exhibiton on the manor's history, the manor's kitchen and the adjoining Klamerus Sowa family cottage (a typical Highlander dwelling of the Nowy Targ vicinity from the period before the World War II).

Tatra Expeditions of Wojciech Weiss

Gallery of 20th Century Art at Oksza Villa,
a branch of the Tatra Museum
Zamoyskiego 25
July 20th - August 31st

 

In 2019, thanks to funding from the Minister of Culture and National Heritage, the Tatra Museum in Zakopane purchased fifteen Tatra landscapes by the artist Wojciech Weiss. This provides us with an opportunity to present the entire collection of Weiss’ works in the Tatra Museum’s possession.

The exhibition presents, above all, a unique, compact selection of Tatra landscapes created in the years 1897-1899. In addition to newly acquired works, it also includes four paintings purchased in 2007 from subsidies of the Marshal Office of the Małopolska Region.

Wojciech Weiss stayed in Zakopane and the Podhale region several times at the end of the 19th century. His Tatra work was mostly the result of open air painting sessions from 1897-1902.

His expeditions to the Tatras and the increasingly fashionable Zakopane took place first during his studies, under the influence of his teacher and master Leon Wyczółkowski (who had visited Zakopane regularly since 1896). It was with him and Włodzimierz Tetmajer, another painter, that Weiss spent the summer of 1899 in Zakopane. In a letter to his parents, he wrote: Such heaven, as we observed yesterday, will not meet in the lowlands [...] behind us heavy clouds carrying rain, bright moon on the side, lightning ahead, everything here right away. [...] I have not imagined such wild Tatra Mountains. A gigantic funnel scratched with furrows, stained with snow, at the bottom the lake encircled with stones. This is so deaf, empty, no vegetation, nothing alive, that it takes fear. He painted over twenty small oil and pastel compositions, mainly from the area around Czarny Staw Gąsienicowy Lake and Hala Gąsienicowa Meadow. During this, as well as during earlier and later (1902) wanderings, he created miniature studies of Tatra landscapes, painted on paper or slats, or sketched with coal. These works show fragments of the Tatra landscape; in particular Czarny Staw Gąsienicowy Lake, Tatra Mountain peaks, mountain screes and slopes illuminated by the sun, and extensive views of the Tatra Mountains painted from Gubałówka Hill. The artist tried to show the power of the mountains by showing these framed fragments dynamically and moodily, in changing atmospheric conditions or interesting lighting. Landscapes were painted in a synthetic way, with free strokes of a brush or pencil.

The artist undoubtedly was sensitive to the role of light from his time spent in Wyczółkowski's studio. It was also not without significance for his painting in the Tatras that Weiss had a fascination with the miniature landscape compositions of Jan Stanis∤awski, whose work he said was full of “finesse and taste”. The small size of Weiss’s work is in reference to that of Stanis∤awski. He was also inspired by the then fashionable Japanese woodcuts, which he collected and referenced throughout his work.

Anna Król writes about it: In the views of the Tatras, Weiss makes a daring interpretation of the Japanese woodcut and Japanese aesthetics. He uses a synthetic formula and a narrow color range with great feeling. [...] The first Tatra infatuation of Weiss is part of the broad phenomenon of fascination with the Tatra Mountains and highlanders. However, the artist is not interested in folklore or props. He sees threatening and powerful mountains, which the painter finds extremely difficult to approach in order to give them their "intensity". The ability to synthesize and to extract the meaning of a fragment enables the artist to convey the essence of the mountains, it is enough for him to study a part of the landscape around the glade Hala Gąsienicowa.

In spite of these numerous references to other artists, the works of Wojciech Weiss in the Tatras fully reveal the individual style of the artist and are characterized by high artistic quality. They are particularly valuable due to the fact that in the later works of Wojciech Weiss, the subject of the Tatras was no longer present. During the artist's life, his "impressions from the Tatras" were never exhibited.

The exhibition is complemented by portraits of two artists closely related to Zakopane: Wojciech Brzegi and Stanisław Gałek. Both of them were almost parallel to the artist and studied at the Krakow Academy of Fine Arts, a university with which Wojciech Weiss was also connected. The artists also probably met in and around Zakopane. These works can therefore be regarded as portraits of friends, and came to the Museum collections directly from the families of the portrayed persons.

Helena Pitoń

Translated by Emily Learman

Wojciech Weiss (1875-1950) is one of the greatest Polish painters. In the years 1890-1899 he studied at the Krakow School of Fine Arts, initially with Jan Matejko, Władysław Łuszczkiewicz, Florian Cynka, Józef Unierzyski, and then also with Leon Wyczółkowski and Julian Fałat. He graduated with a gold medal; he was still educated in Paris and Italy. From 1897, he was a member of the Society of Polish Artists "Sztuka", in 1906 he became a member of the Vienna "Secession". From 1907 he taught at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow - from 1910 as an associate professor; from 1913 as a full professor. Twice - in 1918/19 and 1933-1936 - he was also the rector of this university.

 

 

“...AND THIS SCULPTURE REMAINED WITH ME”

ANTONI RZĄSA 1919-2019.

Gallery of 20th Century Art at Oksza Villa, a branch of the Tatra Museum
Zamoyskiego 25
June 29th - September 1st 2019

"The house stood on the hill, later there were raspberries, and in these raspberries I was always, the family did not bother me at all. (...) I had two passions in life: sculpture and architecture. It did not work out for me with architecture (...) and this sculpture remained with me.”- Antoni Rząsa

Antoni Rząsa followed the example of many of his classmates, and began his adventure with art by sculpting in his free time. Most likely, his artwork stemmed from a subconscious desire to create his own reality, different from that of everyday life. In the year of 2019 we are celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of the most important Polish sculptors of the second half of the twentieth century.

Antoni Rząsa was born in Futoma in the Podkarpacie region, which is in the southeast part of Poland. In this region Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches were commonly found beside Jewish synagogues. This symbiosis of cultures, as well as a search for the artist’s roots, were the departure point for the Tatra Museum and Antoni Rząsa Gallery’s artistic and scientific program in honor of Rząsa, and the exhibition “...and this sculpture remained with me. Antoni Rząsa 1919-2019”.  

The young Antoni Rząsa first attended the famous Zakopane School of Wood Industry in November of 1938, where he was taught by the local artist Antoni Kenar. His education was interrupted, however, when the Second World War broke out. Rząsa did not return to Zakopane until after the war, when he carried the weight of difficult life experiences and the scars of war. Though his family did not want him to return to Zakopane, he arrived with a strong desire to create. The young artist had a special interest in religious art, and was inspired by oleographic prints, Orthodox iconography, and church sculptures. Rząsa combined his fascination with religious art with his education from Antoni Kenar, and the result was his signature style of sculpture. In these wooden sculptures, religious figures such as Christ and the Madonna are presented in a unique, more universal style.

The exhibition “...and this sculpture remained with me. Antoni  Rząsa 1919-2019” is divided into four parts. In the first one, we present the first sculptural attempts by Antoni Rząsa (from the collections of the Antoni Rząsa Gallery and the Częstochowa Museum) combined with oil prints and sculptures of saints (from the collections of the Tatra Museum), icons and sculptures from the District Museum in Nowy Sącz, and a worried Christ from the Władysław Orkan Museum in Rabka. In this way we follow the development of Antoni Rząsa’s particular style, his crystallization of interests, and his search for the best way to convey his emotions through art. All of the artwork presented in this exhibition, including sculptures, icons, and photographic prints, utilize repetitive aesthetic motifs and codified symbols that give them a universality and readability for different groups of viewers. This versatility proved to be extremely important for the Zakopane artist. Another important experience for the art of Antoni Rząsa was his stay in Italy: "For four months I could not sculpt anything. In my eyes, as in the film, I have been moving pictures of sculptures, paintings and architecture seen in Italy. " The context of this experience is illustrated by Wojciech Plewiński's photographs from the Italian cycle in the second half of the 1950s.

Rząsa did not take photographs of his time in Italy, but from his journey he brought home a rich set of postcards. Correspondence from Rząsa’s Italian trip, and souvenirs of dried plants with descriptions by the sculptor, are also on display in the exhibition. The third part of the exhibition showcases the artist’s experiences within Zakopane, such as his time working at the High School of Art Techniques (formerly the School of Wood Industry) and his first exhibitions. The heart of the entire exhibition is the room in which we present Antoni Rząsa’s most mature and well-known works.

As the artist himself said: "The theme of my sculptures is always a man, his dignity, his activity on the eternal path of passing that takes place in nature. I try to talk about people in a simple language that is accessible to everyone."

Julita Dembowska, Art Department of the Tatra Museum

Translated by Emily Learman

 

 

A SHELTER FOR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE TATRAS AND PODHALE

 

19.05.2019 - 31.12.2019
MAIN BUILDING OF THE TATRA MUSEUM
Zakopane, ul. Krupówki 10

 

The Dr. Tytus Chałubiński Tatra Museum was established in 1888, and in 1889 it was opened to visitors. This initially small regional institution, which took up only two rooms in a local highlander’s cottage in the centre of Zakopane, was tasked with ambitious goals. It was to focus on didactics and research, on exploring the Tatra Mountains and the entire vicinity.

This fundamental idea was taken up and quite specifically developed by Juliusz Zborowski (1888-1965), the first director of the Museum. He devoted all of his talent and effort into making a research centre in the Tatras, which would provide support to those interested in studying the mountains and the region located at their foot. His endeavours led to the creation of an institution which became a model regional museum attracting prominent scientists, initiating research projects and constantly developing its professional resources – the library and the museum collections.

The exhibition draws on the idea of the Museum which, as Juliusz Zborowski said, was “a shelter for knowledge about the Tatras and Podhale”. The rather small space of the display determines the synthetic form of the show. In this case, we are dealing with an installation of a sort, which has been arranged in the spirit of a museum catalogue. It has been created from selected items donated to the Museum in the times of Juliusz Zborowski by academics and amateurs who contributed to the making of the body of knowledge about this very special corner of Poland, its environment, history, and culture. The collection serves as a preface to the story about the researchers who had made it, and about the Tatra Museum – the special “shelter” for the knowledge that they and Juliusz Zborowski – the host of the place for many years – had worked on.

Come and see the exhibition which is a part of the celebrations of the 130th anniversary of the Tatra Museum – an institution which was born out of passion for knowledge about the Tatras and the people who live there.